101 Smart Questions to Ask on Your Interview

by Ron Fry
Thomson Delmar Learning, 192 pages, $9.74


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The interview is going great. You’ve built up a rapport with the person interviewing you and you’re beginning to get excited about working for this company. Then comes the dreaded moment, possibly the hardest question you’ll ever face. “Do you have any questions for me?” Unless you’re prepared and have done your homework, you could easily go blank at this critical juncture. “Do you have any questions for me?” is a test that you must pass if you want to land the job. 101 Smart Questions is a tool to help make sure you do pass. It will give you questions of your own that will make you feel that you are in charge and prepared to shine.
 
The book is divided into sections that include questions to ask about the company, about your boss’s “style” and what to ask after receiving an offer. Especially helpful is a list of things not to do that includes asking about time off, salary, and benefits and letting interviewers see you sweat. The best tack is to get the interviewer talking so you grow comfortable with their style then are able to match it. And if you learn nothing else from 101 Smart Questions, you’ll learn the importance of shaping your questions to the position you are interviewing for instead of asking broad, irrelevant ones.
 
Fry also authored Great Answers to the Toughest Interview Questions and he continues to help job seekers hit the right chords. According to the author, chapter two is the most important because it deals with the professional questions you ask yourself before you even make a phone call, answer an ad or send out a resume. Some of these questions include What are your passions? and What kinds of people do you like working with? As the product and the salesperson you have to be fully aware and updated on what you are selling to the employer.
 
The section with questions to ask your potential new boss contains helpful information that will put you ahead of your competition. Some of these include What would you like to be able to say about your new hire one year from now? and How fast is the company growing? This engaging style of questioning will ultimately help you gain traction and see that the interview process is not a firing squad march, but a golden opportunity to learn and communicate that you are the best candidate.
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